3 years ago

Danshen protects against early-stage alcoholic liver disease in mice via inducing PPARα activation and subsequent 4-HNE degradation

Zhongyan Du, Lei Ding, Zhenyuan Song, Like Wo, Xiaobing Dou, Lihua Tang
Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a type of chronic liver disease caused by long-term heavy ethanol consumption. Danshen is one of the most commonly used substances in traditional Chinese medicine and has been widely used for the treatment of various diseases, and most frequently, the ALD. The current study aims to determine the potential beneficial effect of Danshen administration on ALD and to clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms. Danshen administration improved liver pathologies of ALD, attenuated alcohol-induced increment of hepatic 4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) formation, and prevented hepatic Peroxisome proliferators activated receptor alpha (PPARα) suppression in response to chronic alcohol consumption. Cell culture studies revealed that both hepatoprotective effect and increased intracellular 4-HNE clearance instigated by Danshen supplementation are PPARα-dependent. In conclusion, Danshen administration can protect against ALD via inducing PPARα activation and subsequent 4-HNE degradation.

Publisher URL: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0186357

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