3 years ago

Topliss Batchwise Schemes Reviewed in the Era of Open Data Reveal Significant Differences between Enzymes and Membrane Receptors

Topliss Batchwise Schemes Reviewed in the Era of Open Data Reveal Significant Differences between Enzymes and Membrane Receptors
Lars Richter
In 1977, John G. Topliss introduced the Topliss Batchwise Scheme, a straightforward nonmathematical procedure to assist medicinal chemists in optimizing the substitution pattern of a phenyl ring. Despite its long period of application, a thorough validation of this method has been missing so far. Here, we address this issue by gathering 129 congeneric series from the ChEMBL database, suitable to retrospectively assess the approach. Frequency analysis of Topliss’ schemes showed that the π, Es, σ, and −σ scheme occurred in 17, 20, 6, and 4 congeneric series, respectively. We observed a significant difference of π scheme frequency in enzymes versus membrane receptors, with 12 versus only 2 occurrences. Validation of Topliss schemes in potency optimization showed a remarkable performance increase after restricting the data set to analogue series tested solely against enzymes. In this setting, the Es and the π scheme were successful in 50% and 56% of the analogue series, respectively.

Publisher URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jcim.7b00195

DOI: 10.1021/acs.jcim.7b00195

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.