3 years ago

A Newly Revised Classification of the Protozoa*

G. POLJANSKY, V. SPRAGUE, A. R. LOEBLICH, D. LYNN, G. DEROUX, J. GRAIN, B. M. HONIGBERG, J. VAVRA, J. O. CORLISS, N. D. LEVINE, E. G. MERINFELD, F. C. PAGE, III. J. LOM, F. G. WALLACE, F. E. G. COX, G. F. LEEDALE

Abstract

SYNOPSIS The subkingdom Protozoa now includes over 65,000 named species, of which over half are fossil and ∼ 10,000 are parasitic. Among living species, this includes ∼ 250 parasitic and 11,300 free‐living sarcodines (of which ∼ 4,600 are foraminiferids); 1.800 parasitic and 5,100 free‐living flagellates: ∼ 5,600 parasitic “Sporozoa” (including Apicomplexa, Microspora, Myxospora, and Aseetospora); and ∼ 2,500 parasitic and 4,700 free‐living ciliates. There are undoubtedly thousands more still unmamed. Seven phyla of PROTOZOA are accepted in this classification—SARCOMASTIGOPHORA. LABYRINTHOMORPHA, APICOMPLEXA, MICROSPORA, ASCETOSPORA, MYXOSPORA, and CILIOPHORA. Diagnoses are given for these and for all higher taxa through suborders, and representative genera of each are named. the present scheme is a considerable revision of the Society's 1964 classification, which was prepared at a time when perhaps 48,000 species had been named. It has been necessitated by the acquisition of a great deal of new taxonomic information, much of it through electron microscopy. It is hoped that the present classification incorporates most of the major changes that will be made for some time. and that it will be used for many years by both protozoologists and non‐protozoologists.

Publisher URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1550-7408.1980.tb04228.x@10.1111/(ISSN)1550-7408.DenisHLynnVI

DOI: 10.1111/j.1550-7408.1980.tb04228.x@10.1111/(ISSN)1550-7408.DenisHLynnVI

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