3 years ago

Feedback kinetics in mechanochemistry; the importance of cohesive states

Lei Gao, Ben Hutchings, Stuart Lloyd James, Deborah Elizabeth Crawford, Peijun Hu
Abstract: Although mechanochemical synthesis is becoming more widely applied and even commercialised, greater basic understanding is needed if the field is to progress on less of a trial-and-error basis. We report that a mechanochemical reaction in a ball mill exhibits unusual sigmoidal feedback kinetics that differ dramatically from the simple first-order kinetics for the same reaction in solution. An induction period followed by a rapid increase in reaction rate before the rate decreases again as the reaction goes to completion. The origin of these unusual kinetics is found to be a feedback cycle involving both chemical and mechanical factors. During the reaction the physical form of the reaction mixture changes from a powder to a cohesive rubber-like state, and this results in the observed reaction rate increase. The study reveals that non-obvious and dynamic rheological changes in the reaction mixture must be appreciated to understand how mechanochemical reactions progress.

Publisher URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/doi

DOI: 10.1002/anie.201706723

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