3 years ago

Nutritional and Acquired Deficiencies in Inositol Bioavailability. Correlations with Metabolic Disorders.

Mirko Minini, Simona Dinicola, Vittorio Unfer, Mariano Bizzarri, Alessandra Cucina, Roberto Verna
Communities eating a western-like diet, rich in fat, sugar and significantly deprived of fibers, share a relevant increased risk of both metabolic and cancerous diseases. Even more remarkable is that a low-fiber diet lacks some key components-as phytates and inositols-for which a mechanistic link has been clearly established in the pathogenesis of both cancer and metabolic illness. Reduced bioavailability of inositol in living organisms could arise from reduced food supply or from metabolism deregulation. Inositol deregulation has been found in a number of conditions mechanistically and epidemiologically associated to high-glucose diets or altered glucose metabolism. Indeed, high glucose levels hinder inositol availability by increasing its degradation and by inhibiting both myo-Ins biosynthesis and absorption. These underappreciated mechanisms may likely account for acquired, metabolic deficiency in inositol bioavailability.

Publisher URL: http://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18102187

DOI: 10.3390/ijms18102187

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