3 years ago

Human mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component (mARC): An electrochemical method for identifying new substrates and inhibitors

Human mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component (mARC): An electrochemical method for identifying new substrates and inhibitors
As recently as 2006 the mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component (mARC) was identified as the fourth and last Mo enzyme present in humans. Its physiological role remains unknown. mARC is capable of reducing a variety of N-hydroxylated compounds such as amidoximes to their corresponding amidine and there is considerable interest in this enzyme from a pharmaceutical perspective. mARC is a target for N-hydroxylated pro-drugs that may be reductively activated intracellularly to release potent drugs such as cationic amidinium ions, which exhibit a broad spectrum of activity as antithrombotics and against various bacteria and parasites. In the quest for a rapid screen of new mARC substrates and inhibitors we present an electrochemical method which utilizes the natural electron partner of mARC, cytochrome b 5, coupled to an electrochemical electrode. Mediated electron transfer from the electrode via cytochrome b 5 to mARC results in a catalytic current in the presence of substrate.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S1388248117302771

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