3 years ago

Characterisation of the mucilage polysaccharides from Dioscorea opposita Thunb. with enzymatic hydrolysis

The mucilage polysaccharides from Dioscorea opposita (DOMP) were extracted and treated with a single/dual enzymatic hydrolysis. The characterisation and viscosity were subsequently investigated in this study. DOMP obtained 62.52% mannose and 23.45% glucose. After single protease and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) treatments, the mannose content was significantly reduced to 3.96%, and glucose increased from 23.45% to 45.10%. Dual enzymatic hydrolysis also decreased the mannose and glucose contents to approximately 18%–35% and 7%–19%, respectively. The results suggest that enzymatic degradation could effectively remove the protein from DOMP accompanied by certain polysaccharides, especially mannose. The molecular weight, surface morphology, viscosity and particle sizes were measured. Enzymatic hydrolysis reduced molecular weight, decreased the viscosity, and increased the particle sizes, which indicates that the characterisations of DOMP samples were altered as structures changed. This study was a basic investigation into characterisation of DOMP to contribute to the processing of food by-products.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S030881461731717X

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