3 years ago

Vascular endothelial cell mechanosensing: New insights gained from biomimetic microfluidic models

Vascular endothelial cell mechanosensing: New insights gained from biomimetic microfluidic models
In vivo, cells of the vascular system are subjected to various mechanical stimuli and have demonstrated the ability to adapt their behavior via mechanotransduction. Recent advances in microfluidic and “on-chip” techniques have provided the technology to study these alterations in cell behavior. Contrary to traditional in vitro assays such as transwell plates and parallel plate flow chambers, these microfluidic devices (MFDs) provide the opportunity to integrate multiple mechanical cues (e.g. shear stress, confinement, substrate stiffness, vessel geometry and topography) with in situ quantification capabilities. As such, MFDs can be used to recapitulate the in vivo mechanical setting and systematically vary microenvironmental conditions for improved mechanobiological studies of the endothelium. Additionally, adequate modelling provides for enhanced understanding of disease progression, design of cell separation and drug delivery systems, and the development of biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Here, we will discuss the advances in knowledge about endothelial cell mechanosensing resulting from the design and application of biomimetic on-chip and microfluidic platforms.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S108495211630297X

You might also like
Never Miss Important Research

Researcher is an app designed by academics, for academics. Create a personalised feed in two minutes.
Choose from over 15,000 academics journals covering ten research areas then let Researcher deliver you papers tailored to your interests each day.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.