3 years ago

AMPylation targets the rate-limiting step of BiP's ATPase cycle for its functional inactivation

Steffen Preissler, Ruming Chen, Randy J Read, Yahui Yan, David Ron, Lukas Rohland
The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized Hsp70 chaperone BiP contributes to protein folding homeostasis by engaging unfolded client proteins in a process that is tightly coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis. The inverse correlation between AMPylation and the burden of unfolded ER proteins suggests a post-translational mechanism for adjusting BiP's activity to changing levels of ER stress, but the underlying molecular details are unexplored. We present biochemical and crystallographic studies indicating that irrespective of the identity of the bound nucleotide AMPylation biases BiP towards a conformation normally attained by the ATP-bound chaperone. AMPylation does not affect the interaction between BiP and J-protein co-factors but appears to allosterically impair J protein-stimulated ATP-hydrolysis, resulting in the inability of modified BiP to attain high affinity for its substrates. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism by which AMPylation serves as a switch to inactivate BiP, limiting its interactions with substrates whilst conserving ATP.

Publisher URL: https://elifesciences.org/articles/29428

DOI: 10.7554/eLife.29428

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.