3 years ago

Bleeding out the quality-adjusted life years: evaluating the burden of primary dysmenorrhea using time trade-off and willingness-to-pay methods

Bleeding out the quality-adjusted life years:  evaluating the burden of primary dysmenorrhea using time trade-off and willingness-to-pay methods
Gulácsi, László, Brodszky, Valentin, Baji, Petra, Rencz, Fanni, Ruzsa, Gábor, Stalmeier, Peep F.M., Gradvohl, Edina, Péntek, Márta
Abstract AbstractPrimary dysmenorrhea (PD), or painful menstruation in the absence of identified uterine pathology, affects 5 to 9 in every 10 reproductive-aged women. Despite its high prevalence, just a few studies with very small patient numbers have focused on health-related quality of life impairment in PD. We aimed to assess health-related quality of life values for a severe and a mild hypothetical PD health state using 10-year time trade-off and willingness-to-pay methods. In 2015, a nationwide convenience sample of women, aged between 18 and 40 years, was recruited using an Internet-based cross-sectional survey in Hungary. Respondents with a known history of secondary dysmenorrhea were excluded. Data on 1836 and 160 women, with and without a history of PD, respectively, were analysed. Mean utility values for the severe and mild health states were 0.85 (median 0.95) and 0.94 (median 1), respectively. Participants were willing to pay a mean of €1127 (median €161) and €142 (median €16) for a complete cure from the severe and mild PD health states. Compared with the non-PD group, women with PD valued both health states worse according to willingness to pay (P < 0.05) but similar in the time trade-off. It seems that PD substantially contributes to the quality-adjusted life year loss in this age group, which is comparable with losses from chronic diseases such as type 1 diabetes, asthma, atopic eczema, or chronic migraine. Our findings provide a useful input to cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses of PD treatments.
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