3 years ago

Chronic Stress in Young German Adults: Who Is Affected? A Prospective Cohort Study.

Erika von Mutius, Jessica Gerlich, Doris Windstetter, Gudrun Weinmayr, Jon Genuneit, Ronald Herrera, Wolff Schlotz, Katja Radon, Christian Vogelberg, Dennis Nowak, Ursula Berger, Matthias Weigl
We aimed to prospectively assess changes in chronic stress among young adults transitioning from high school to university or working life. A population-based cohort in Munich and Dresden (Germany) was followed from age 16-18 (2002-2003) to age 20-23 (2007-2009) (n = 1688). Using the Trier Inventory for the Assessment of Chronic Stress, two dimensions of stress at university or work were assessed: work overload and work discontent. In the multiple ordinal generalized estimating equations, socio-demographics, stress outside the workplace, and job history were additionally considered. At follow-up, 52% of the population were university students. Work overload increased statistically significantly from first to second follow-up, while work discontent remained constant at the population level. Students, compared to employees, reported a larger increase in work overload (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.33; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.07, 1.67), while work discontent did not differ between the groups. In conclusion, work overload increases when young adults transition from school to university/job life, with university students experiencing the largest increase.

Publisher URL: http://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14111325

DOI: 10.3390/ijerph14111325

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