3 years ago

Covalent modifications of the amyloid beta peptide by hydroxynonenal: Effects on metal ion binding by monomers and insights into the fibril topology

Covalent modifications of the amyloid beta peptide by hydroxynonenal: Effects on metal ion binding by monomers and insights into the fibril topology
Amyloid β peptides (Aβ) and metal ions are associated with oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Oxidative stress, acting on ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acyl chains, produces diverse products, including 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), which can covalently modify the Aβ that helped to produce it. To examine possible feedback mechanisms involving Aβ, metal ions and HNE production, the effects of HNE modification and fibril formation on metal ion binding was investigated. Results indicate that copper(II) generally inhibits the modification of His side chains in Aβ by HNE, but that once modified, copper(II) still binds to Aβ with high affinity. Fibril formation protects only one of the three His residues in Aβ from HNE modification, and this protection is consistent with proposed models of fibril structure. These results provide insight into a network of biochemical reactions that may be operating as a consequence of oxidative stress in AD, or as part of the pathogenic process.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S0162013417301927

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.