3 years ago

Heteroleptic monometallic and trimetallic ruthenium(II) complexes incorporating a π-extended dipyrrin ligand: Light-activated reactions with the A549 lung cancer cell line

Heteroleptic monometallic and trimetallic ruthenium(II) complexes incorporating a π-extended dipyrrin ligand: Light-activated reactions with the A549 lung cancer cell line
A heteroleptic monometallic ruthenium(II) and a heteroleptic trimetallic ruthenium(II) complex have been synthesized and characterized. Both complexes have an overall 3+ charge, with the charge density greater for the monometallic complex. The electronic spectra of the monometallic ruthenium(II) complex exhibits intense π-π* transitions associated with the bipyridyl groups along with overlapping metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) and ligand centered π-π* transitions ranging from 520nm to approximately 600nm. The trimetallic ruthenium(II) complex, on the other hand, displays more well defined transitions with the expected π-π* transition of the bipyridyl groups at 294nm and Ru(dπ) to bpy(π*) MLCT transitions at 355nm and 502nm. In addition to these absorption bands an intense transition, 578nm, resulting from overlapping dipyrrin (π-π*) and Ru(dπ) to dipyrrin(π*) transitions is observed. Electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical experiments were used to help in assigning these transitions. Irradiation of the complexes in the presence of plasmid DNA within the photodynamic therapy window (600nm to 850nm) reveal, using electrophoresis, that both complexes are capable of causing photo-damage to the DNA backbone. The trimetallic ruthenium(II) complex; however, also shows the ability to generate photoinduced DNA damage in the absence of oxygen, suggesting a photo-oxidative process. Studies of the complexes toward lung cancer cells (A549 cell line) in the absence of light indicate little cytotoxicity up to 50μM. Upon irradiation of the cells with a low power 420nm light source the trimetallic complex showed considerably greater photo-cytotoxicity compared to the monometallic analog. A dose-dependent response curve gives an IC50 of 92μM for complex B.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S0162013417302258

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.