3 years ago

Hospitalized opioid-dependent patients: Exploring predictors of buprenorphine treatment entry and retention after discharge

Christina S. Lee, Jane M. Liebschutz, Bradley J. Anderson, Michael D. Stein
Objectives Few studies have explored predictors of entry into and retention in buprenorphine treatment following linkage from an acute medical hospitalization. Methods This secondary analysis of a completed clinical trial focuses on medically hospitalized, opioid-dependent patients (n = 72) who were randomized to an intervention including buprenorphine induction and dose stabilization during hospitalization followed by post-discharge transition to office-based buprenorphine treatment (OBOT). Predictors included demographics, days hospitalized, prior buprenorphine/methadone treatment, PTSD symptoms, social support, and readiness for drug use cessation. Outcome variables were treatment entry and retention (number of days in OBOT). Results Previous buprenorphine treatment, more days hospitalized, and higher PTSD symptoms predicted OBOT entry. Prior treatment, older age, and non-minority status were associated with a higher mean number of days in OBOT. Conclusions OBOT may appeal to patients who have tried buprenorphine in other settings. Linking hospitalized patients to OBOT may improve utilization of addiction treatment. Scientific Significance Prior substance treatment, longer hospital stay, and mental health should be examined in future linkage studies. (Am J Addict 2017;26:667–672)

Publisher URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/doi

DOI: 10.1111/ajad.12533

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.