3 years ago

Two receptor tyrosine phosphatases dictate the depth of axonal stabilizing layer in the visual system

Satoko Hakeda-Suzuki, Hiroki Takechi, Hinata Kawamura, Takashi Suzuki
Formation of a functional neuronal network requires not only precise target recognition, but also stabilization of axonal contacts within their appropriate synaptic layers. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the stabilization of axonal connections after reaching their specifically targeted layers. Here, we show that two receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), LAR and Ptp69D, act redundantly in photoreceptor afferents to stabilize axonal connections to the specific layers of the Drosophila visual system. Surprisingly, by combining loss-of-function and genetic rescue experiments, we found that the depth of the final layer of stable termination relied primarily on the cumulative amount of LAR and Ptp69D cytoplasmic activity, while specific features of their ectodomains contribute to the choice between two synaptic layers, M3 and M6, in the medulla. These data demonstrate how the combination of overlapping downstream but diversified upstream properties of two RPTPs can shape layer specific wiring.

Publisher URL: https://elifesciences.org/articles/31812

DOI: 10.7554/eLife.31812

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