3 years ago

Early Carboniferous adakite-like and I-type granites in central Qiangtang, northern Tibet: Implications for intra-oceanic subduction and back-arc basin formation within the Paleo-Tethys Ocean

Recent studies have proposed that the Late Devonian ophiolites in the central Qiangtang region of northern Tibet were formed in an oceanic back-arc basin setting, which has led to controversy over the subduction setting of the Longmucuo–Shuanghu–Lancangjiang Suture Zone (LSLSZ) during the Late Devonian to Early Carboniferous. In this paper we present new data about a suite of granite plutons that intrude into ophiolite in central Qiangtang. Our aim was to identify the type of subduction and to clarify the existence of an intra-oceanic back-arc basin in the LSLSZ during the Late Devonian to Early Carboniferous. The suite of granites consists of monzogranites, syenogranites, and granodiorites. Our laser ablation–inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry zircon U–Pb data yielded Early Carboniferous crystallization ages of 357.2Ma, 357.4Ma and 351.1Ma. We subsequently investigated the petrogenesis and tectonic setting of these granites based on their geochemical and Hf isotopic characteristics. First, we divided the granites into high Sr/Y (HSG) and low Sr/Y granites (LSG). The HSG group contains monzogranites and granodiorites that have similar geochemical characteristics to adakites (i.e., high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, low MgO, Y, and Yb contents, and no pronounced negative Eu anomaly), although they have slightly lower Sr and Al2O3 contents, caused by crystal fractionation during late magmatic evolution. Therefore, we define the HSG group as adakite-like granites. The study of the HSG shows that they are adakite-like granites formed by partial melting of oceanic crust and experience fractional crystallization process during late evolution. However, some differences between the monzogranites and granodiorites indicate that there are varying degree contributions of subducted sediments during diagenesis. The LSG group contains syenogranites that have distinct negative correlations between their P2O5 and SiO2 contents, and Y and Th contents have significant positive correlations with Rb. The above characteristics indicate that the syenogranites are typical I-type granites. The results of this study also show that the LSG were produced by magma mixing between the mantle and juvenile oceanic crust. The field study found that the Early Carboniferous suite of granites intruded into contemporaneous ophiolites that formed in an intra-oceanic back-arc basin, and were associated with coeval A-type granites in this region. Based on the geochemical and isotopic data presented in this paper and regional geological data, we consider that the HSG were formed during intra-oceanic subduction of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean in the Early Carboniferous. The LSG and A-type granites were formed in an intra-oceanic back-arc basin setting caused by roll-back of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean slab. This confirms that the subduction of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean in the Early Carboniferous was intra-oceanic subduction, and provides important evidence for the existence of an intra-oceanic back-arc basin during the Late Devonian to Early Carboniferous.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S0024493717303808

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.