3 years ago

Estimating Fault Friction From Seismic Signals.

Jacques Riviere, Chris Marone, Robert A. Guyer, Christopher X. Ren, David C. Bolton, Claudia Hulbert, Bertrand Rouet-Leduc, Paul A. Johnson

Nearly all aspects of earthquake rupture are controlled by the friction along the fault that progressively increases with tectonic forcing, but in general cannot be directly measured. Here we show that fault friction can be determined at any time, from the continuous seismic signal. In a classic laboratory experiment of repeating earthquakes, we find that the seismic signal follows a specific pattern with respect to fault friction, allowing us to determine the fault's position within its failure cycle. Using machine learning, we show that instantaneous statistical characteristics of the seismic signal are a fingerprint of the fault zone shear stress and frictional state. Further analysis of this fingerprint leads to a simple constitutive law quantitatively relating the seismic signal power and fault friction. These results suggest that fault zone frictional characteristics, and the state of stress in the surrounding rock, can be inferred from seismic waves, which could provide a powerful technique for seismic hazard assessment and earthquake warning systems.

Publisher URL: http://arxiv.org/abs/1710.04172

DOI: arXiv:1710.04172v3

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.