4 years ago

mPEGylated solanesol micelles as redox-responsive nanocarriers with synergistic anticancer effect

mPEGylated solanesol micelles as redox-responsive nanocarriers with synergistic anticancer effect
We prepared an amphiphilic redox-responsive conjugate based on mPEGylated solanesol, solanesyl poly(ethylene glycol) dithiodipropionate (SPDP), along with its inert counterpart solanesyl poly(ethylene glycol) succinate (SPGS), which self-assembled in aqueous solution to form redox-responsive micelles. Used as efficient drug carriers for doxorubicin (DOX), the micelles acted as synergistic agents for cancer therapy. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed that the SPDP micelles had average diameters of 111nm, which decreased to 88nm after the encapsulation of DOX. The mean diameters and size distribution of the disulfide-containing micelles changed obviously in the presence of the reducing agent glutathione (GSH), whereas no changes occurred in the case of redox-insensitive SPGS micelles. DOX could be loaded into both types of micelles, with drug loading content of about 4.0%. A significantly accelerated release of DOX was triggered by GSH for DOX-loaded SPDP micelles, compared with DOX-loaded SPGS micelles. Blank SPGS and SPDP micelles displayed higher inhibition of HeLa and MCF-7 cell proliferation but less cytotoxicity to normal L-02 cells at similar concentrations. Confocal microscopic observation indicated that a greater amount of DOX was delivered into the nuclei of cells following 9 or 12h incubation with DOX-loaded micelles. In vivo studies on H22-bearing Swiss mice demonstrated the superior anticancer activity of DOX-loaded SPDP micelles over free DOX and DOX-loaded SPGS micelles. All of the data presented here suggested that these SPDP micelles may have a dual function, as they are preferentially toxic for tumor cells alone and are efficient and safe carriers for anticancer drugs. Statement of Significance Various nanoscale drug carriers were used to enhance therapeutic effect of many drugs. While, the metabolites of high quantities of carriers may cause additional short- or long-term toxicities. In this study, a new systems based on solanesol derivatives was developed for anticancer drug delivery. There are two features for this system. One is solanesol originated bioactivity of the carrier, which will synergistically facilitate therapeutic effect of the encapsulated drug. The other is the redox-responsive drug release behavior adaptable to the glutathione-rich atmosphere of tumor cell. All the hypothesis have been elucidated in this work through in vitro and in vivo studies. It was found that this drug delivery system may have a dual function, as they are preferentially toxic for tumor cells alone and are efficient and safe carriers for anticancer drugs.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S1742706117306128

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