3 years ago

Applications of solid-state NMR to membrane proteins

Applications of solid-state NMR to membrane proteins
Membrane proteins mediate flow of molecules, signals, and energy between cells and intracellular compartments. Understanding membrane protein function requires a detailed understanding of the structural and dynamic properties involved. Lipid bilayers provide a native-like environment for structure-function investigations of membrane proteins. In this review we give a general discourse on the recent progress in the field of solid-state NMR of membrane proteins. Solid-state NMR is a variation of NMR spectroscopy that is applicable to molecular systems with restricted mobility, such as high molecular weight proteins and protein complexes, supramolecular assemblies, or membrane proteins in a phospholipid environment. We highlight recent advances in applications of solid-state NMR to membrane proteins, specifically focusing on the recent developments in the field of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, proton detection, and solid-state NMR applications in situ (in cell membranes). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biophysics in Canada, edited by Lewis Kay, John Baenziger, Albert Berghuis and Peter Tieleman.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S1570963917301516

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