3 years ago

Itinerant antiferromagnetic BaMn$_2$Pn$_2

s showing both negative and positive magnetoresistances.
Kim-khuong Huynh, Takuma Ogasawara, Keita Kitahara, Yoichi Tanabe, Stephane Yu Matsushita, Taimu Tahara, Takanori Kida, Masayuki Hagiwara, Denis Arčon, Katsumi Tanigaki

We report the discovery of a novel giant magnetoresistance (GMR) phenomenon in a family of BaMn$_{2}$Pn$_{2}$ antiferromagnets (Pn stands for P, As, Sb, and Bi) with a parity-time symmetry. The resistivities of these materials are reduced by $60$ times in magnetic fields ($\vec{H}

s), thus yielding the GMR of about $-98\%$. The GMR changes systematically along with the Pn elements, hinting that its origin is the spin orbit coupling (SOC) and/or $d$-$p$ orbital hybridization. A positive MR component emerging on top of the negative GMR at low temperatures suggests an orbital-sensitive magnetotransport as $\vec{H}$ suppresses the conduction of the electron-like carriers in the $d$-like band but enhances those of hole-like ones in the $d$-$p$ hybridized band. The anisotropy of the GMR reveals that the electrical conductivity is extremely sensitive to the minute changes in the direction of the antiferromagnetic moments induced by the parity-time breaking $\vec{H}$, which seems to be associated with a magnetoelectric effect in the dynamic regime of conduction electrons. We attribute the observed GMR to the non-trivial low energy band of BMPn's, which is governed by the parity-time symmetry and an magnetic hexadecapole ordering.

Publisher URL: http://arxiv.org/abs/1811.06140

DOI: arXiv:1811.06140v1

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s showing both negative and positive magnetoresistances.","abstract":"

We report the discovery of a novel giant magnetoresistance (GMR) phenomenon\nin a family of BaMn$_{2}$Pn$_{2}$ antiferromagnets (Pn stands for P, As, Sb,\nand Bi) with a parity-time symmetry. The resistivities of these materials are\nreduced by $60$ times in magnetic fields ($\\vec{H}; window.__REDUX_STATE__ = {"feed":{"scrollPos":0,"openAccess":false,"performRefetch":{}},"history":{"historyChanges":0},"onboarding":{"stepsList":[{"stepId":"type","stepName":"What kind of researcher are you?","stepDesc":"","options":[]},{"stepId":"Role","stepName":"What role describes you the best?","stepDesc":"","options":[]},{"stepId":"Org","stepName":"Where do you work or study?","stepDesc":""},{"stepId":"ra","stepName":"Research Areas","stepDesc":"Select the research areas you are interested in","options":[]},{"stepId":"topics","stepName":"Topics","stepDesc":"Select the topics you are interested in","options":[]},{"stepId":"publications","stepName":"Publications","stepDesc":"We have selected some popular publications for you to follow","options":[]},{"stepId":"feeds","stepName":"Feeds","stepDesc":"We have created this feed based on your interests, you can edit and add more from the side menu","options":[]}],"step":1,"loading":false,"loadingText":"Loading...","selections":[{"name":"type","selection":null,"type":"single","mandatory":true},{"name":"role","selection":null,"type":"single","mandatory":true},{"name":"work_study","selection":null,"type":"single","mandatory":false},{"name":"ra","selection":[],"type":"multiple","mandatory":true},{"name":"topics","selection":[],"type":"multiple","mandatory":true},{"name":"publications","selection":[],"type":"multiple","mandatory":false},{"name":"feeds","selection":[],"type":"multiple","mandatory":false}],"topicsNextCursor":null,"topicsFetchingNext":false}};

3 years ago

Itinerant antiferromagnetic BaMn$_2$Pn$_2

s showing both negative and positive magnetoresistances.
Kim-khuong Huynh, Takuma Ogasawara, Keita Kitahara, Yoichi Tanabe, Stephane Yu Matsushita, Taimu Tahara, Takanori Kida, Masayuki Hagiwara, Denis Arčon, Katsumi Tanigaki

We report the discovery of a novel giant magnetoresistance (GMR) phenomenon in a family of BaMn$_{2}$Pn$_{2}$ antiferromagnets (Pn stands for P, As, Sb, and Bi) with a parity-time symmetry. The resistivities of these materials are reduced by $60$ times in magnetic fields ($\vec{H}

s), thus yielding the GMR of about $-98\%$. The GMR changes systematically along with the Pn elements, hinting that its origin is the spin orbit coupling (SOC) and/or $d$-$p$ orbital hybridization. A positive MR component emerging on top of the negative GMR at low temperatures suggests an orbital-sensitive magnetotransport as $\vec{H}$ suppresses the conduction of the electron-like carriers in the $d$-like band but enhances those of hole-like ones in the $d$-$p$ hybridized band. The anisotropy of the GMR reveals that the electrical conductivity is extremely sensitive to the minute changes in the direction of the antiferromagnetic moments induced by the parity-time breaking $\vec{H}$, which seems to be associated with a magnetoelectric effect in the dynamic regime of conduction electrons. We attribute the observed GMR to the non-trivial low energy band of BMPn's, which is governed by the parity-time symmetry and an magnetic hexadecapole ordering.

Publisher URL: http://arxiv.org/abs/1811.06140

DOI: arXiv:1811.06140v1

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Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
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Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.

s), thus yielding the GMR\nof about $-98\\%$. The GMR changes systematically along with the Pn elements,\nhinting that its origin is the spin orbit coupling (SOC) and/or $d$-$p$ orbital\nhybridization. A positive MR component emerging on top of the negative GMR at\nlow temperatures suggests an orbital-sensitive magnetotransport as $\\vec{H}$\nsuppresses the conduction of the electron-like carriers in the $d$-like band\nbut enhances those of hole-like ones in the $d$-$p$ hybridized band. The\nanisotropy of the GMR reveals that the electrical conductivity is extremely\nsensitive to the minute changes in the direction of the antiferromagnetic\nmoments induced by the parity-time breaking $\\vec{H}$, which seems to be\nassociated with a magnetoelectric effect in the dynamic regime of conduction\nelectrons. We attribute the observed GMR to the non-trivial low energy band of\nBMPn's, which is governed by the parity-time symmetry and an magnetic\nhexadecapole ordering.\n

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3 years ago

Itinerant antiferromagnetic BaMn$_2$Pn$_2

s showing both negative and positive magnetoresistances.
Kim-khuong Huynh, Takuma Ogasawara, Keita Kitahara, Yoichi Tanabe, Stephane Yu Matsushita, Taimu Tahara, Takanori Kida, Masayuki Hagiwara, Denis Arčon, Katsumi Tanigaki

We report the discovery of a novel giant magnetoresistance (GMR) phenomenon in a family of BaMn$_{2}$Pn$_{2}$ antiferromagnets (Pn stands for P, As, Sb, and Bi) with a parity-time symmetry. The resistivities of these materials are reduced by $60$ times in magnetic fields ($\vec{H}

s), thus yielding the GMR of about $-98\%$. The GMR changes systematically along with the Pn elements, hinting that its origin is the spin orbit coupling (SOC) and/or $d$-$p$ orbital hybridization. A positive MR component emerging on top of the negative GMR at low temperatures suggests an orbital-sensitive magnetotransport as $\vec{H}$ suppresses the conduction of the electron-like carriers in the $d$-like band but enhances those of hole-like ones in the $d$-$p$ hybridized band. The anisotropy of the GMR reveals that the electrical conductivity is extremely sensitive to the minute changes in the direction of the antiferromagnetic moments induced by the parity-time breaking $\vec{H}$, which seems to be associated with a magnetoelectric effect in the dynamic regime of conduction electrons. We attribute the observed GMR to the non-trivial low energy band of BMPn's, which is governed by the parity-time symmetry and an magnetic hexadecapole ordering.

Publisher URL: http://arxiv.org/abs/1811.06140

DOI: arXiv:1811.06140v1

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.