3 years ago

Duck “beak atrophy and dwarfism syndrome” disease complex: Interplay of novel goose parvovirus-related virus and duck circovirus?

Z. Xie, J. Chen, R. Zhang, P. Li, W. Wang, S. Jiang, J. Li, J. Lan
As a newly emerged infectious disease, duck “beak atrophy and dwarfism syndrome (BADS)” disease has caused huge economic losses to waterfowl industry in China since 2015. Novel goose parvovirus-related virus (NGPV) is believed the main pathogen of BADS disease; however, BADS is rarely reproduced by infecting ducks with NGPV alone. As avian circovirus infection causes clinical symptoms similar to BADS, duck circovirus (DuCV) is suspected the minor pathogen of BADS disease. In this study, an investigation was carried out to determine the coinfection of NGPV and DuCV in duck embryos and in ducks with BADS disease. According to our study, the coinfection of emerging NGPV and DuCV was prevalent in East China (Shandong, Jiangsu and Anhui province) and could be vertical transmitted, indicating their cooperative roles in duck BADS disease.

Publisher URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/doi

DOI: 10.1111/tbed.12812

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