3 years ago

Surface density: a new parameter in the fundamental metallicity relation of star-forming galaxies.

Rieko Momose, Tomotsugu Goto, Tetsuya Hashimoto

Star-forming galaxies display a close relation among stellar mass, metallicity and star-formation rate (or molecular-gas mass). This is known as the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) (or molecular-gas FMR), and it has a profound implication on models of galaxy evolution. However, there still remains a significant residual scatter around the FMR. We show here that a fourth parameter, the surface density of stellar mass, reduces the dispersion around the molecular-gas FMR. In a principal component analysis of 29 physical parameters of 41,338 star-forming galaxies, the surface density of stellar mass is found to be the fourth most important parameter. The new four-dimensional fundamental relation forms a tighter hypersurface that reduces the metallicity dispersion to 50\% of that of the molecular-gas FMR. We suggest that future analyses and models of galaxy evolution should consider the FMR in a four-dimensional space that includes surface density. The dilution time scale of gas inflow and the star-formation efficiency could explain the observational dependence on surface density of stellar mass.

Publisher URL: http://arxiv.org/abs/1801.05808

DOI: arXiv:1801.05808v1

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.