3 years ago

High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Characterization of Ligand Binding to a Protein Immobilized in a Silica Matrix

High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Characterization of Ligand Binding to a Protein Immobilized in a Silica Matrix
Claudio Luchinat, Marco Fragai, Stefano Giuntini, Linda Cerofolini, Enrico Ravera, Alexandra Louka
Solid-state NMR is becoming a powerful tool to detect atomic-level structural features of biomolecules even when they are bound to (or trapped in) solid systems that lack long-range three-dimensional order. We here demonstrate that it is possible to probe protein–ligand interactions from a protein-based perspective also when the protein is entrapped in silica, thus translating into biomolecular solid-state NMR all of the considerations that are usually made to understand the chemical nature of the interaction of a protein with its ligands. This work provides a proof of concept that also immobilized enzymes can be used for protein-based NMR protein–ligand interactions for drug discovery.

Publisher URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcb.7b05679

DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpcb.7b05679

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