3 years ago

Distinctive fluoride fluorescent probes with ratiometric characteristics combinate desilylation, hydrogen bond and ESIPT process: Spectral and mechanistic studies

Distinctive fluoride fluorescent probes with ratiometric characteristics combinate desilylation, hydrogen bond and ESIPT process: Spectral and mechanistic studies
Developing methods for fluoride ions detection have drawn great attentions due to their vital roles in chemical, industrial and biological processes. In present work, we have constructed two novel fluorescent probes (HBT-Ratio-F1 and HBT-Ratio-F2) for detecting fluoride. Notably, probe HBT-Ratio-F1 displayed distinctive binate ratiometric characteristics in recognizing fluoride, which is very rare in current probes. In order to further improve the selectivity of HBT-Ratio-F1, two strategies, desilylation process and hydrogen bond, were simultaneously employed for HBT-Ratio-F2, which displayed highly sensitive and selective properties towards fluoride with ratiometric characteristic. Sensing mechanism was investigated by NMR titration and DFT studies. Different with previous mechanism, herein the two probes just bind with fluoride but without deprotonation process. HBT-Ratio-F2 was finally applied in imaging fluoride in live cells.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S0925400517315034

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