3 years ago

Efficacy of Generic Oral Directly Acting Agents in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

Gyan Ranjan, Nancy Kalra, Mousumi Mahanta, Subrat Kumar Acharya, Arpan H. Patel, Baibaswata Nayak, Rahul Sethia, Shalimar, Swatantra Gupta, Pabitra Sahu, Saurabh Kedia, Gyanranjan Rout, Ashish Agarwal
Novel direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are now the standard of care for the management of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Branded DAAs are associated with high sustained virological response at 12 weeks post-completion of therapy (SVR12), but are costly. We aimed to assess the efficacy of generic oral DAAs in a real life clinical scenario. Consecutive patients with known HCV infection who were treated with generic-oral DAA regimens (May 2015 to January 2017) were included. Demographic details, prior therapy and SVR12 were documented. 490 patients (mean age: 38.9±12.7years) were treated with generic DAAs in the study time period. Their clinical presentations included chronic hepatitis (CHC) in 339 (69.2%) of cases, compensated cirrhosis in 120 (24.48%) cases, and decompensated cirrhosis in 31 (6.32%) cases. Genotype 3 was most common (n=372, 75.9%) followed by genotype 1 (n=97, 19.8%). Treatment naïve and treatment-experienced (defined as having previous treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin) were 432 (88.2%) and 58 (11.8%) respectively. Generic DAA treatment regimens included sofosbuvir in combination with ribavirin (n=175), daclatasvir alone (n=149), ribavirin and peginterferon (n=80), ledipasvir alone (n=43), daclatasvir and ribavirin (n=37), and ledipasvir and ribavirin (n=6). Overall SVR12 was 95.9% (470/490) for all treatment regimens. SVR12 for treatment-naïve and experienced patients was 97.0% (419/432) and 87.9% (51/58) respectively, P=0.005. High SVR12 was observed with various regimens, irrespective of genotype and underlying liver disease status. There were no differences in SVR12 with 12 weeks or 24 weeks therapy. No major adverse event occurred requiring treatment stoppage. Generic oral DAAs are associated with high SVR rates in patients with HCV infection in a real life clinical scenario. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Publisher URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/doi

DOI: 10.1111/jvh.12870

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.