3 years ago

A comparison of UVb compact lamps in enabling cutaneous vitamin D synthesis in growing bearded dragons

A. C. Heijboer, F. M. Baines, W. H. Hendriks, J. P. Leeuwen, D. G. A. B. Oonincx, J. J. E. Diehl, M. Kik
The effect of exposure to different UVb compact lamps on the vitamin D status of growing bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) was studied. Forty-two newly hatched bearded dragons (<24 h old) were allocated to six treatment groups (n = 7 per group). Five groups were exposed to different UVb compact lamps for two hours per day, with a control group not exposed to UVb radiation. At 120 days of age, blood samples were obtained and concentrations of 25(OH)D3, Ca, P and uric acid were determined. In addition, plasma 25(OH)D3 concentration was determined in free-living adult bearded dragons to provide a reference level. Only one treatment resulted in elevated levels of 25(OH)D3 compared to the control group (41.0 ± 12.85 vs. 2.0 ± 0.0 nmol/L). All UVb-exposed groups had low 25(OH)D3 plasma levels compared to earlier studies on captive bearded dragons as well as in comparison with the free-living adult bearded dragons (409 ± 56 nmol/L). Spectral analysis indicated that all treatment lamps emitted UVb wavelengths effective for some cutaneous vitamin D synthesis. None of these lamps, under this regime, appeared to have provided a sufficient UVb dose to enable synthesis of plasma 25(OH)D3 levels similar to those of free-living bearded dragons in their native habitat.

Publisher URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/doi

DOI: 10.1111/jpn.12728

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