3 years ago

Locally embedded presages of global network bursts [Neuroscience]

Locally embedded presages of global network bursts [Neuroscience]
Douglas J. Bakkum, Satohiro Tajima, Hirokazu Takahashi, Takeshi Mita, Taro Toyoizumi

Spontaneous, synchronous bursting of neural population is a widely observed phenomenon in nervous networks, which is considered important for functions and dysfunctions of the brain. However, how the global synchrony across a large number of neurons emerges from an initially nonbursting network state is not fully understood. In this study, we develop a state-space reconstruction method combined with high-resolution recordings of cultured neurons. This method extracts deterministic signatures of upcoming global bursts in “local” dynamics of individual neurons during nonbursting periods. We find that local information within a single-cell time series can compare with or even outperform the global mean-field activity for predicting future global bursts. Moreover, the intercell variability in the burst predictability is found to reflect the network structure realized in the nonbursting periods. These findings suggest that deterministic local dynamics can predict seemingly stochastic global events in self-organized networks, implying the potential applications of the present methodology to detecting locally concentrated early warnings of spontaneous seizure occurrence in the brain.

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