3 years ago

Listwaenite in the Sartohay ophiolitic mélange (Xinjiang, China): A genetic model based on petrology, U-Pb chronology and trace element geochemistry

Listwaenite lenses in the Sartohay ophiolitic mélange (Xinjiang, China) were formed via reactions between serpentinite and metasomatic fluids. First, serpentinite changed into talc schist via the reaction of serpentine + CO2 → talc + magnesite + H2O. Second, talc schist changed into listwaenite via the reaction of talc + CO2 → magnesite + quartz + H2O. Magnetite was progressively destroyed during transformation from serpentinite to talc schist, and completely consumed in listwaenite. Zircon crystals 30–100 μm long, disseminating in talc schist, undeformed listwaenite and mylonitized listwaenite, coexist with talc, quartz and magnesite, while micron-sized zircon grains (< 5 μm in length) occur along the shearing foliation in the weakly deformed listwaenite and mylonitized listwaenite. We postulate that these micron-sized zircon crystals may have grown in-situ from medium-temperature hydrothermal fluids. Concentrations of most trace elements including high field strength elements (HFSE) increase from the undeformed, through the weakly deformed, to the mylonitized listwaenite, showing a positive correlation with the degrees of deformation and proportions of micron-size zircon, apatite, rutile and monazite. The large zircon crystals recovered from talc schist, undeformed listwaenite and mylonitized listwaenite yield similar weighted mean U-Pb ages (302.9 ± 6.8 Ma, 299.7 ± 5.5 Ma and 296.5 ± 3.5 Ma), and are thought to represent the age of formation of the talc schist and listwaenite. These ages are indistinguishable within errors and suggest a rapid transformation from talc schist to listwaenite. Some zircon rims in samples of the undeformed listwaenite and mylonitized listwaenite give much younger apparent U-Pb ages (280–277 Ma), which could be interpreted as a recrystallization age reflecting late-stage shearing in the Sartohay ophiolitic mélange.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S0024493718300392

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