3 years ago

Role of MicroRNAs in the pathogenesis and treatment of progressive liver injury in NAFLD and liver fibrosis

Role of MicroRNAs in the pathogenesis and treatment of progressive liver injury in NAFLD and liver fibrosis
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) increases the risk of various liver injuries, ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis and cirrhosis, and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Ample evidence has suggested that aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is functionally involved in the activation of cellular stress, inflammation and fibrogenesis in hepatic cells, including hepatocytes, Kupffer and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), at different pathological stages of NAFLD and liver fibrosis. Here, we overview recent findings on the potential role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of NAFLD, including lipotoxicity, oxidative stress, metabolic inflammation and fibrogenesis. We critically assess the literatures on both human subjects and animal models of NAFLD and liver fibrosis with miRNA dysregulation and their mechanisms of actions and liver damage. We further highlight the potential use of miRNA mimics or antimiRNAs as therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of NAFLD and liver fibrosis.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S0169409X18300097

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.