3 years ago

Heading toward Macromolecular and Nanosized Bioresponsive MRI Probes for Successful Functional Imaging

Heading toward Macromolecular and Nanosized Bioresponsive MRI Probes for Successful Functional Imaging
Goran Angelovski
The quest for bioresponsive or smart contrast agents (SCAs) in molecular imaging, in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is progressively increasing since they allow for the monitoring of essential biological processes on molecular and cellular levels in a dynamic fashion. These are offshoot molecules of common contrast agents that are sensitive to biochemical changes in their environment, capable of reporting on such changes by inducing MRI signal alteration. Various mechanistic approaches and different types of SCAs have been developed in order to visualize desired processes, using diverse imaging protocols and methods. To date, the most frequently exploited probes are paramagnetic molecules that change longitudinal or transverse relaxation at proton frequency, or so-called T1- and T2-weighted probes, respectively. Moreover, SCAs operating by the chemical exchange saturation transfer mechanism, suitable for 19F MRI or possessing hyperpolarized nuclei have also appeared in the past decade, slowly finding their role in functional imaging studies.

Publisher URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.accounts.7b00203

DOI: 10.1021/acs.accounts.7b00203

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