3 years ago

Regulating Secretory Proteostasis through the Unfolded Protein Response: From Function to Therapy

Regulating Secretory Proteostasis through the Unfolded Protein Response: From Function to Therapy
Lars Plate, R. Luke Wiseman

Imbalances in secretory proteostasis induced by genetic, environmental, or aging-related insults are pathologically associated with etiologically diverse protein misfolding diseases. To protect the secretory proteome from these insults, organisms evolved stress-responsive signaling pathways that regulate the composition and activity of biologic pathways involved in secretory proteostasis maintenance. The most prominent of these is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR), which functions to regulate ER proteostasis in response to ER stress. While the signaling mechanisms involved in UPR activation are well defined, the impact of UPR activation on secretory proteostasis is only now becoming clear. Here, we highlight recent reports defining how activation of select UPR signaling pathways influences proteostasis within the ER and downstream secretory environments. Furthermore, we describe recent evidence that highlights the therapeutic potential for targeting UPR signaling pathways to correct pathologic disruption in secretory proteostasis associated with diverse types of protein misfolding diseases.

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