3 years ago

Novel approaches to HIV therapy [version 1; referees: 2 approved]

Eric S. Daar
There are approximately 35 million people infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), with an estimated 2 million incident infections annually across the globe. While HIV infection was initially associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, advances in therapy have transformed it into a chronic and manageable disease. In addition, there is very strong evidence that those on antiretroviral therapy are much less likely to transmit infection to their partners. The success rates for maintaining viral suppression in treated patients has dramatically increased owing to the development of agents that are potent and well tolerated and can often be co-formulated into single pills for simplification. This review will outline advances in treatment over the last several years as well as new strategies that may shift the existing treatment paradigm in the near future.

Publisher URL: https://f1000research.com/articles/6-759/v1

DOI: 10.12688/f1000research.11164.1

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