3 years ago

Identification of novel PDEδ interacting proteins

Identification of novel PDEδ interacting proteins
Prenylation is a post-translational modification that increases the affinity of proteins for membranes and mediates protein-protein interactions. The retinal rod rhodopsin-sensitive cGMP 3',5'-cyclic phosphodiesterase subunit delta (PDEδ) is a prenyl binding protein that is essential for the shuttling of small GTPases between different membrane compartments and, thus, for their proper functioning. Although the prenylome comprises up to 2% of the mammalian proteome, only few prenylated proteins are known to interact with PDEδ. A proteome-wide approach was employed to map the PDEδ interactome among the prenylome and revealed RAB23, CDC42 and CNP as novel PDEδ interacting proteins. Moreover, PDEδ associates with the lamin A mutant progerin in a prenyl-dependent manner. These findings shed new light on the role of PDEδ in binding (and regulating) prenylated proteins in cells.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S0968089617311823

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