3 years ago

Biological hydrolysis pretreatment on secondary sludge: Enhancement of anaerobic digestion and mechanism study

Biological hydrolysis pretreatment on secondary sludge: Enhancement of anaerobic digestion and mechanism study
The performance of biological hydrolysis (BH) pretreatment on municipal secondary sludge was evaluated in this study. During 6-day BH at 42°C (BH42), soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) increased from 175.2±38.2mg/L to 3314.5±683.4mg/L; the dominant volatile fatty acid (VFA) was acetic acid, and its concentration increased from 41.5±2.1mg/L to 786.0±133.2mg/L. The extracted extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from untreated secondary sludge contained three main fractions, and Fraction I gradually decreased from 133.9kDa to 24.9kDa during 6-day BH42. The BH pre-treatment at 42°C and 55°C both achieved more than 4-log reduction of total coliforms and 3-log reduction of E. coli. The BH pretreated secondary sludge at 15-day biochemical methane potential (BMP) test was comparable with the untreated secondary sludge after 30-day BMP, showing a significant enhancement on the acceleration of biogas production by BH pretreatment.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S096085241731369X

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