3 years ago

Self-reported sleep disturbance is associated with Alzheimer's disease risk in men

To study the association between self-reported sleep disturbances and dementia risk. Methods Self-reported sleep disturbances and established risk factors for dementia were measured in men at ages 50 (n = 1574) and 70 (n = 1029) years. Dementia incidence was determined by reviewing their patient history between ages 50 and 90 years. In addition, plasma levels of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides 1–40 and 1–42 were measured at ages 70, 77, and 82 years. Results Cox regression demonstrated that men with self-reported sleep disturbances had a higher risk of developing dementia (+33%) and Alzheimer's disease (AD, +51%) than men without self-reported sleep disturbances (both P < .05). Binary logistic regression showed the increased risk for both dementia (+114%) and AD (+192%) were highest when sleep disturbance was reported at age 70 years (both P < .001). No group differences were found in Aβ levels. Conclusion Improving sleep quality may help reduce the neurodegenerative risk in older men.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S1552526014028192

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.