3 years ago

The emerging role of ECM crosslinking in T cell mobility as a hallmark of immunosenescence in humans

The emerging role of ECM crosslinking in T cell mobility as a hallmark of immunosenescence in humans
Immunosenescence is thought to result from cellular aging and to reflect exposure to environmental stressors and antigens, including cytomegalovirus (CMV). However, not all of the features of immunosenescence are consistent with this view, and this has led to the emergence of the sister theory of “inflammaging”. The recently discovered diffuse tissue distribution of resident memory T cells (TRM) which don't recirculate, calls these theories into question. These cells account for most T cells residing in barrier epithelia which sit in and travel through the extracellular matrix (ECM). With almost all studies to date carried out on peripheral blood, the age-related changes of the ECM and their consequences for T cell mobility, which is crucial for the function of these cells, have been largely ignored. We propose an update of the theoretical framework of immunosenescence, based on a novel hypothesis: the increasing stiffness and cross-linking of the senescent ECM lead to a progressive immunodeficiency due to an age-related decrease in T cell mobility and eventually the death of these cells. A key element of this mechanism is the mechanical stress to which the cell cytoplasm and nucleus are subjected during passage through the ECM. This hypothesis is based on an “evo-devo” perspective bringing together some major characteristics of aging, to create a single interpretive framework for immunosenescence.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S1568163716301015

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.