3 years ago

Systematic review and metaanalysis of genetic association studies of urinary symptoms and prolapse in women

Family studies and twin studies demonstrate that lower urinary tract symptoms and pelvic organ prolapse are heritable. This review aimed to identify genetic polymorphisms tested for an association with lower urinary tract symptoms or prolapse, and to assess the strength, consistency, and risk of bias among reported associations. Study Design PubMed and HuGE Navigator were searched up to May 1, 2014, using a combination of genetic and phenotype key words, including “nocturia,” “incontinence,” “overactive bladder,” “prolapse,” and “enuresis.” Major genetics, urology, and gynecology conference abstracts were searched from 2005 through 2013. We screened 889 abstracts, and retrieved 78 full texts. In all, 27 published and 7 unpublished studies provided data on polymorphisms in or near 32 different genes. Fixed and random effects metaanalyses were conducted using codominant models of inheritance. We assessed the credibility of pooled associations using the interim Venice criteria. Results In pooled analysis, the rs4994 polymorphism of the ADRB3 gene was associated with overactive bladder (odds ratio [OR], 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7–3.6; n = 419). The rs1800012 polymorphism of the COL1A1 gene was associated with prolapse (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0–1.7; n = 838) and stress urinary incontinence (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4–3.2; n = 190). Other metaanalyses, including those for polymorphisms of COL3A1, LAMC1, MMP1, MMP3, and MMP9 did not show significant effects. Many studies were at high risk of bias from genotyping error or population stratification. Conclusion These metaanalyses provide moderate epidemiological credibility for associations of variation in ADRB3 with overactive bladder, and variation of COL1A1 with prolapse. Clinical testing for any of these polymorphisms cannot be recommended based on current evidence.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S0002937814008175

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.