3 years ago

Design of silk proteins with increased heme binding capacity and fabrication of silk-heme materials

Design of silk proteins with increased heme binding capacity and fabrication of silk-heme materials
In our previous studies, heme was bound into honeybee silk to generate materials that could function as nitric oxide sensors or as recoverable heterogeneous biocatalysts. In this study, we sought to increase the heme-binding capacity of the silk protein by firstly redesigning the heme binding site to contain histidine as the coordinating residue and secondly, by adding multiple histidine residues within the core of the coiled coil core region of the modified silk protein. We used detergent and a protein denaturant to confirm the importance of the helical structure of the silk for heme coordination. Aqueous methanol treatment, which was used to stabilize the materials, transformed the low-spin, six-coordinate heme to a five-coordinate high-spin complex, thus providing a vacant site for ligand binding. The optimal aqueous methanol treatment time that simultaneously maintains the helical protein structure and stabilizes the silk material without substantial leaching of heme from the system was determined.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S0162013417302908

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