3 years ago

Advances in keratinocyte delivery in burn wound care

Advances in keratinocyte delivery in burn wound care
This review gives an updated overview on keratinocyte transplantation in burn wounds concentrating on application methods and future therapeutic cell delivery options with a special interest in hydrogels and spray devices for cell delivery. To achieve faster re-epithelialisation of burn wounds, the original autologous keratinocyte culture and transplantation technique was introduced over 3 decades ago. Application types of keratinocytes transplantation have improved from cell sheets to single-cell solutions delivered with a spray system. However, further enhancement of cell culture, cell viability and function in vivo, cell carrier and cell delivery systems remain themes of interest. Hydrogels such as chitosan, alginate, fibrin and collagen are frequently used in burn wound care and have advantageous characteristics as cell carriers. Future approaches of keratinocyte transplantation involve spray devices, but optimisation of application technique and carrier type is necessary.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S0169409X17300960

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