3 years ago

Genetic mutations in RNA-binding proteins and their roles in ALS

Gene W. Yeo, Katannya Kapeli, Fernando J. Martinez

Abstract

Mutations in genes that encode RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have emerged as critical determinants of neurological diseases, especially motor neuron disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). RBPs are involved in all aspects of RNA processing, controlling the life cycle of RNAs from synthesis to degradation. Hallmark features of RBPs in neuron dysfunction include misregulation of RNA processing, mislocalization of RBPs to the cytoplasm, and abnormal aggregation of RBPs. Much progress has been made in understanding how ALS-associated mutations in RBPs drive pathogenesis. Here, we focus on several key RBPs involved in ALS—TDP-43, HNRNP A2/B1, HNRNP A1, FUS, EWSR1, and TAF15—and review our current understanding of how mutations in these proteins cause disease.

Publisher URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00439-017-1830-7

DOI: 10.1007/s00439-017-1830-7

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.