3 years ago

Quantum coherence as a witness of vibronically hot energy transfer in bacterial reaction center

Donatas Zigmantas, Petra Edlund, Sebastian Westenhoff, David Paleček

Photosynthetic proteins have evolved over billions of years so as to undergo optimal energy transfer to the sites of charge separation. On the basis of spectroscopically detected quantum coherences, it has been suggested that this energy transfer is partially wavelike. This conclusion depends critically on the assignment of the coherences to the evolution of excitonic superpositions. We demonstrate that, for a bacterial reaction center protein, long-lived coherent spectroscopic oscillations, which bear canonical signatures of excitonic superpositions, are essentially vibrational excited-state coherences shifted to the ground state of the chromophores. We show that the appearance of these coherences arises from a release of electronic energy during energy transfer. Our results establish how energy migrates on vibrationally hot chromophores in the reaction center, and they call for a reexamination of claims of quantum energy transfer in photosynthesis.

Publisher URL: http://advances.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/3/9/e1603141

DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1603141

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.