3 years ago

HLA based selection of epitopes offers a potential window of opportunity for vaccine design against HIV

The pace of progression to AIDS after HIV infection varies from individual to individual. While some individuals develop AIDS quickly, others are protected from the onset of disease for more than a decade (elite controllers and long term non-progressors). The mechanisms of protection are not yet clearly understood, though various factors including host genetics, immune components and virus attenuation have been elucidated partly. The influence of HLA alleles on HIV-1 infection and disease outcome has been studied extensively. Several HLA alleles are known to be associated with resistance to infection or delayed progression to AIDS after infection. Similarly, certain HLA alleles are reported to be associated with rapid progression to disease. Since HLA alleles influence the outcome of HIV infection differentially, selection of epitopes specifically recognized by protective alleles could serve asa rational means for HIV vaccine design. In this review article, we discuss existing knowledge on HLA alleles and their association with resistance/susceptibility to HIV and its relevance to vaccine design.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S0264410X17311684

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