3 years ago

Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in young adults: Obesity increases fasting levels only in men whereas glucose ingestion, and not protein or lipid intake, increases postprandial concentrations regardless of sex and obesity

Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in young adults: Obesity increases fasting levels only in men whereas glucose ingestion, and not protein or lipid intake, increases postprandial concentrations regardless of sex and obesity
Héctor F. Escobar-Morreale, María Ángeles Martínez-García, Mora Murri, María Insenser, Miriam Ojeda-Ojeda, Manuel Luque-Ramírez, Elena Fernández-Durán, Rafael Montes-Nieto
Scope Oxidative stress and damage participate in the pathophysiology of obesity and its metabolic complications. We studied the influence of sex, obesity, and ingestion of different macronutrients on fasting and postprandial thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), which can be considered as an index of lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage. Methods and results We studied 19 men and 17 women, out of whom nine men and eight women had obesity. We collected blood samples in the fasting state and, on alternate days, following the ingestion of 300 kcal in the form of glucose, lipids, or proteins. Fasting TBARS concentrations correlated with waist circumference and were increased in obese men compared with nonobese men. This increase was not, however, observed in women. TBARS concentrations showed a marked increase following the ingestion of glucose in parallel to the increase in plasma glucose when considering all subjects as a whole, but did not increase after the oral intake of lipids and proteins. Conclusion Plasma TBARS concentrations are increased in the fasting state only in obese men in association with abdominal adiposity, and increases markedly after the ingestion of glucose, but not after oral intake of lipids and proteins, regardless of sex and obesity. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentrations are markers of lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage and increase markedly in young adults after the ingestion of glucose, but not after oral intake of lipids and proteins. This increase occurs irrespective of sex and obesity. Moreover, such responses paralleled the changes in plasma glucose concentrations after the glucose, lipid, and protein loads, and not the changes in triglycerides, strongly suggesting that postprandial hyperglycemia, and not hypertriglyceridemia, is actually involved in postprandial oxidative damage.

Publisher URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/doi

DOI: 10.1002/mnfr.201700425

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.