3 years ago

Fasting serum hippuric acid is elevated after bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) consumption and associates with improvement of fasting glucose levels and insulin secretion in persons at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Fasting serum hippuric acid is elevated after bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) consumption and associates with improvement of fasting glucose levels and insulin secretion in persons at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes
David E Laaksonen, Vanessa DF Mello, Jussi Pihlajamäki, Riitta Puupponen-Pimiä, Maria A Lankinen, Matti Uusitupa, Riitta Törrönen, Marjukka Kolehmainen, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Marko Lehtonen, Jaana Lindström, Kati Hanhineva
Scope Urinary hippuric acid has been proposed as a biomarker for fruit, vegetable, and polyphenol consumption. We assessed how serum hippuric acid changes after a bilberry-enriched diet (BB; high anthocyanin intake) and another berry diet including strawberries, raspberries, and cloudberries (SRC; lower anthocyanin intake) and how these changes associate with insulin and glucose metabolism. Methods and results Hippuric acid was measured with LC-QTOF-MS metabolite profiling analysis from fasting serum samples at baseline and after an 8-week intervention in 47 individuals with features of the metabolic syndrome who were randomized to either a BB diet (n = 15), an SRC diet (n = 20) or a control diet (n = 12). Fasting serum hippuric acid increased significantly (3.5-fold, p = 0.001) only in the BB group and correlated with changes in fasting plasma glucose concentration (r = –0.54, p < 0.05) and insulin secretion (r = 0.59, p < 0.05). These associations were confirmed in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (n = 198). Conclusion Fasting serum hippuric acid is increased after consumption of anthocyanin-rich bilberries, and may contribute to the beneficial effect of bilberry consumption through its associations with better glycemic control and β-cell function. Bilberries are rich dietary source of phenolic compounds, in particular anthocyanins. Our study demonstrates how high consumption of bilberries resulted in increased plasma levels of hippuric acid, a compound resulting from metabolism of colonic microbiota. Increased plasma hippuric acid was associated with beneficial changes in glucose and insulin metabolism, and may thus contribute to the beneficial health effects related to bilberry consumption.

Publisher URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/doi

DOI: 10.1002/mnfr.201700019

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