3 years ago

Strategies to increase the efficacy of using gut microbiota for the modulation of obesity

M. Jin, C. Jiang, M. S. Riaz Rajoka, J. Li, H. Yang, Q. Huang, J. Shi, D. Shao
Obesity is one of the most serious global public health challenges of the 21st century. The adjustment of gut microbiota is often recommended as an efficient strategy to treat obesity. This modulation of gut microbiota can be performed by many methods, including dietary intervention, antibiotic application, the use of prebiotics and probiotics, bariatric surgery and faecal microbiota transplantation. In most cases, positive effects have been observed in response to treatment, but invalid and even contrary effects have also been observed in some cases due to factors that are unrelated to intervention methods, such as genetic factors, patient age or gender, environmental microbiota, climate, geography and lifestyle. These factors can cause variation of gut microbial populations and thus should also be taken into consideration when selecting modulation strategies.

Publisher URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/doi

DOI: 10.1111/obr.12590

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