3 years ago

The NO-heme signaling hypothesis

The NO-heme signaling hypothesis
While the biological role of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) is appreciated, several fundamental aspects of the NOS/NO-related signaling pathway(s) remain incompletely understood. Canonically, the NOS-derived NO diffuses through the (inter)cellular milieu to bind the prosthetic ferro(Fe2+)-heme group of the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). The formation of ternary NO-ferroheme-sGC complex results in the enzyme activation and accelerated production of the second messenger, cyclic GMP. This paper argues that cells dynamically generate mobile/exchangeable NO-ferroheme species, which activate sGC and regulate the function of some other biomolecules. In contrast to free NO, the mobile NO-ferroheme may ensure safe, efficient and coordinated delivery of the signal within and between cells. The NO-heme signaling may contribute to a number of NOS/NO-related phenomena (e.g. nitrite bioactivity, selective protein S-(N-)nitrosation, endothelium and erythrocyte-dependent vasodilation, some neural and immune NOS functions) and predicts new NO-related discoveries, diagnostics and therapeutics.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S0891584917307414

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