3 years ago

Playing Well with Others: Extrinsic Cues Regulate Neural Progenitor Temporal Identity to Generate Neuronal Diversity

Playing Well with Others: Extrinsic Cues Regulate Neural Progenitor Temporal Identity to Generate Neuronal Diversity
Brandon Mark, Chris Q. Doe, Mubarak Hussain Syed

During neurogenesis, vertebrate and Drosophila progenitors change over time as they generate a diverse population of neurons and glia. Vertebrate neural progenitors have long been known to use both progenitor-intrinsic and progenitor-extrinsic cues to regulate temporal patterning. In contrast, virtually all temporal patterning mechanisms discovered in Drosophila neural progenitors (neuroblasts) involve progenitor-intrinsic temporal transcription factor cascades. Recent results, however, have revealed several extrinsic pathways that regulate Drosophila neuroblast temporal patterning: nutritional cues regulate the timing of neuroblast proliferation/quiescence and a steroid hormone cue that is required for temporal transcription factor expression. Here, we discuss newly discovered extrinsic cues regulating neural progenitor temporal identity in Drosophila, highlight conserved mechanisms, and raise open questions for the future.

Publisher URL: http://www.cell.com/trends/genetics/fulltext/S0168-9525(17)30143-9

DOI: 10.1016/j.tig.2017.08.005

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