3 years ago

Mycoplasma pneumoniae from the Respiratory Tract and Beyond.

Waites KB, Xiao L, Liu Y, Atkinson TP, Balish MF
Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important cause of respiratory tract infections in children as well as adults that can range in severity from mild to life-threatening. Over the past several years there has been much new information published concerning infections caused by this organism. New molecular-based tests for M. pneumoniae detection are now commercially available in the United States, and advances in molecular typing systems have enhanced understanding of the epidemiology of infections. More strains have had their entire genome sequences published, providing additional insights into pathogenic mechanisms. Clinically significant acquired macrolide resistance has emerged worldwide and is now complicating treatment. In vitro susceptibility testing methods have been standardized, and several new drugs that may be effective against this organism are undergoing development. This review focuses on the many new developments that have occurred over the past several years that enhance our understanding of this microbe, which is among the smallest bacterial pathogens but one of great clinical importance.

Publisher URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28539503

DOI: PubMed:28539503

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