3 years ago

Major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders from the glial perspective: etiological mechanisms, intervention and monitoring

Despite intense ongoing research efforts, the etiology of psychiatric disorders remains incompletely understood. Among biological factors playing a role in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Anxiety Disorders (ANX), emerging evidence points to the relevance of different types of glia cells and efficient neuron-glia interactions. Here, we review recent findings highlighting the involvement of central nervous system (CNS) glia in MDD and ANX etiology and treatment response. Additionally, several relatively underexplored topics will be discussed: 1) glial response to non-pharmacological therapies, 2) impact of early life adversity on glia, 3) influence of lifestyle factors on glia in the context of MDD and ANX, and 4) monitoring glial functions in patients. It can be concluded that despite the sequence of events is still unclear, alterations in glial cell types are common and somewhat overlapping in ANX, MDD and corresponding animal models. Furthermore, glia are responsive to a variety of treatment and lifestyle options. Looking forward, new research developments can lead to novel types of therapeutic or symptom-relieving approaches targeting glia.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S0149763417304724

You might also like
Never Miss Important Research

Researcher is an app designed by academics, for academics. Create a personalised feed in two minutes.
Choose from over 15,000 academics journals covering ten research areas then let Researcher deliver you papers tailored to your interests each day.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.