3 years ago

Low Plasma Testosterone Is Associated With Elevated Cardiovascular Disease Biomarkers

The relation between testosterone (T) plasma concentration and cardiovascular (CV) risk is unclear, with evidence supporting increased risk in men with low and high T levels. Few studies have assessed CV risk as a function of plasma T levels using objective biomarkers. Aim To determine the relation between T levels and high-sensitivity CV risk biomarkers. Methods Ten thousand forty-one male patients were identified in the database of a commercial clinical laboratory performing biomarker testing. Patients were grouped by total T concentration and associations with the following biomarkers were determined: cardiac troponin I (cTnI), endothelin-1 (ET-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-17A, N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and leptin. Outcomes Association of CV risk markers with levels of T in men. Results The median age of the cohort was 58 years (interquartile range = 48–68), and the median plasma T level was 420 ng/dL (interquartile range = 304–565); T levels did not vary with patient age. An inverse relation between plasma T levels and CV risk was observed for 9 of 10 CV markers: cTnI, ET-1, IL-6, TNF-α, NTproBNP, HDL cholesterol, hs-CRP, HbA1c, and leptin. Even after adjusting for age, body mass index, HbA1c, hs-CRP, and HDL cholesterol levels, the CV markers IL-6, ET-1, NTproBNP, and leptin were significantly associated with a T level lower than 250 ng/dL. Clinical Implications Men with low T levels could be at increased risk for increased CV disease as seen by increased CV risk markers. Strength and Limitations This study was performed in a group of 10,041 men and is the first study to examine CV risk associated with circulating T levels using a large panel of 10 objective biomarkers. This study is limited by an absence of clinical data indicating whether men had pre-existing CV disease or other CV risk factors. Conclusion Men with low plasma T levels exhibit increases in CV risk markers, consistent with a potential increased risk of CV disease. Pastuszak AW, Kohn TP, Estis J, Lipshultz LI. Low Plasma Testosterone Is Associated With Elevated Cardiovascular Disease Biomarkers. J Sex Med 2017;14:1095–1103.

Publisher URL: www.sciencedirect.com/science

DOI: S1743609517313140

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